Eggless Waffles

We recently learned that our Globug is allergic to eggs. We don’t know for certain that she has any particular reaction, but it’s certainly possible that her eczema is triggered by her allergy. So starting about a week ago I cut eggs from my diet, and we’ll be waiting on introducing eggs to hers once she starts solids.

In the meantime, I’ve been researching egg substitutes for various baked goods, and more importantly, breakfast items like pancakes and waffles. The substitution depends on the recipe, but I found recommendations like applesauce, mashed banana, or adding a bit of baking powder and oil.

This morning, Kenny whipped up a new eggless waffle recipe, devised by synthesizing a few recipes he found on the web. The waffles were delicious and unbelievably light and fluffy, thanks in large part to one secret ingredient: sparkling water (thanks mom, for the Sodastream you got us for Chanukah – it’s proving to be even more useful than anticipated!) It’s good to know that my favorite trick for producing light, fluffy matzo balls can be applied to other recipes as well.

I assume one could substitute more oil for the butter and soy milk for the cow variety to make vegan waffles.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1/4 cup corn meal
  • 1/2 cup white flour
  • 1 tbsp butter, melted
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • 2 tbsp sparkling water
  • 1.5 cups milk
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • Pinch of salt

Optional: add 1/4 cup granola and/or 2-3 tbsp coconut

Directions

Mix wet ingredients, mix dry ingredients, combine. Follow waffle iron manufacturer’s instructions.

Fresh out of the waffle iron

Pressure Cooker Pumpkin Puree

As Kenny mentioned, our culinary experiments in India have often led us to source many of the constituent ingredients of our recipes the old-fashioned way. The dishes we prepared for Thanksgiving were no exception, and I was determined that the absence of canned pumpkin puree at our local grocery store was not going to prevent us from eating delicious pumpkin waffles for dessert (we don’t have an oven, so no pies for us, but we did discover Archana’s waffle iron a few days ago). We acquired a beautiful pumpkin from the local produce market in Malleshwaram and resolved to make the puree ourselves.

Of course most pumpkin puree recipes on the interwebs (including this one, which I used for inspiration) involve the use of an oven, which we don’t have. But my time in India has firmly convinced me that there’s pretty much no culinary problem that a pressure cooker can’t solve. Conveniently enough, Sean and Kenny had just purchased a 12L pressure cooker for the turkey, which was just perfect for the pumpkin.

First I cut it in half and removed the stringy stuff and the seeds (which I put aside for delicious toasted garam masala pumpkin seeds later). Then I hacked it up into smaller pieces, and into the pressure cooker it went, with about 3 cups of water. About 20 minutes later I had the “meltingly soft” pumpkin that every recipe demands. After it cooled, it went into the food processor, and then we mixed up the waffle batter. The end result was delicious, and further cemented my belief in the magical powers of the pressure cooker.

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Bisected pumpkin

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All cleaned up and ready for the pressure cooker

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In it goes!

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Delicious pumpkin waffles, garnished with ice cream, cinnamon, and red Kerala bananas (my favorite!)

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Garam masala pumpkin seeds

Ragi Waffles

Kenny and I had a fun breakfast experiment a few days back, attempting to replicate the delicious ragi rotis we enjoyed at Hallimane here in Malleswaram. This was no easy task! Getting the thick batter of ragi flour, water, minced onions, and dill to stick together when transferring it to the frying pan is quite the challenge. Actually flipping the pancakes over to cook the second side is quite near impossible. The end result was tasty but definitely not pretty.

I know that the cooks at Hale Maane have a bit of an advantage – they have a flat grill surface, and they spread the batter out onto a wax paper circle for transfer purposes. For some reason, none of our local grocery stores seem to stock wax paper.

Refusing to give up the ragi roti question, I later had an epiphany – why not employ Archana’s trusty waffle iron to make ragi waffles instead of rotis? I made the batter thinner this time (more water) so that it would be pourable, and the waffle iron produced perfect crispy brown ragi waffles. They taste very similar to rotis, but are much easier to make. We served them with a dollop of dahi (yogurt) and a bit of dill and minced onion.

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